Edmonton City Council could have its first by-elections in 20 years

With the potential loss of two Councillors this year, Edmonton could have it’s first by-elections for City Council in more than two decades.

Councillor Amarjeet Sohi, who represents Ward 12, announced in January that he would seek the federal Liberal nomination in Edmonton-Mill Woods. He was acclaimed on February 12. You can see his campaign page here. Sohi has said he would take leave from Council during the election.

Amarjeet Sohi - Ward 12
Amarjeet Sohi, photo by Dave Cournoyer

Councillor Tony Caterina, who represents Ward 7, was named the Progressive Conservative candidate in Edmonton-Beverly-Clareview on March 28. He was first elected to City Council in 2007. Curiously, Caterina has said he will remain active on Council during the election, but will not draw a pay cheque.

Tony Caterina - Ward 7
Tony Caterina, photo by Dave Cournoyer

On the school board side, Sarah Hoffman is running as the Alberta NDP candidate in Edmonton-Glenora. She was elected to her second term on the Edmonton Public School Board in 2013 and stepped down as chair in January. She still holds her seat on the school board.

Sarah Hoffman - Ward G
Sarah Hoffman, photo by Dave Cournoyer

Now that we know the provincial election is taking place on May 5, a by-election for Tony Caterina and Sarah Hoffman’s seats would take place sometime before August 4 (assuming they win office). The federal election is slated to take place on October 19, so if Amarjeet Sohi were to win, a by-election for his Council seat would need to take place by January 16, 2016.

By-Election Rules

Sections 160-168 of the Municipal Government Act deal with vacancies and by-elections for councils. Here are the key points:

  • Resignations must be made in writing and given to the Chief Administrative Officer (in our case, City Manager Simon Farbrother). The resignations take effect on the date they are received.
  • The Chief Administrative Officer must report the resignation to council at the first meeting after receiving the resignation.
  • A by-election must be held to fill the vacancy unless:
    • It occurs in the 6 months before a general election, or
    • The council consists of 6 or more councillors and the vacancy occurs in the 18 months before a general election (and there’s only one) or in the 12 months before a general election and there’s enough remaining councillors to count one more than the majority
  • A by-election must take place within 90 days of a vacancy, otherwise the Minister of Municipal Affairs may order a date for one or take any other action he or she considers necessary.

The next general municipal election will take place on October 16, 2017, which is still about 30 months away, so none of the “unless” clauses apply. If any of the three mentioned above resign, a by-election would need to be held within 90 days. And since it is very unlikely that Councillor Sohi would resign before winning a seat in October, we’ll almost certainly be looking at two by-elections – one for Caterina and/or Hoffman’s seats, and another for Sohi’s seat.

The nomination and campaign periods would be set by Council following the vacancy becoming official. In practice, the City Manager would bring a report to Council to inform them of the vacancies and would make a recommendation on the nomination and election dates. The same would apply to the Public School Board, except it would be the Chief Returning Officer (Alayne Sinclair) that would bring the report.

By-Election History

Edmonton has had six by-elections in the past, the two most recent of which were for councillors making the jump to either provincial or federal politics:

  • 1907 – Morton MacAuley resigned eight months into his term and left politics.
  • 1911 – James McKinley resigned to protest the firing of two city commissioners.
  • 1912 – Herman McInnes and Charles Gowan both resigned.

julia kiniski
Julia Kiniski at a campaign meeting in 1949, courtesy of the Edmonton Archives

  • 1970 – Julia Kiniski died on October 11, 1969. She had held office since 1963, when she finally won after about a dozen previous attempts. Her son Julian won the by-election, and was the last person to be elected at-large in Edmonton as the ward system took effect in 1971.
  • 1984 – Bettie Hewes resigned after being elected as MLA for Edmonton-Gold Bar.
  • 1994 – Judy Bethel resigned after being elected as Liberal MP for Edmonton-East.

What to expect

Although Council has requested that the Minister of Municipal Affairs amend the Local Election Authorities Act to permit alternate forms of voting (which would make online voting possible) that has not yet happened and so online voting would not be an option for these by-elections.

City Clerk and Returning Officer Alayne Sinclair tells me that turnout is often even worse for by-elections than it is for general elections, so the City would try to pick a date that would maximize turnout. There would also be ample opportunity for advance voting.

With provincial and federal elections, and possibly municipal by-elections, all taking place this year, Edmontonians will be busy at the polls.

Media Monday Edmonton: Update #149

Here’s my latest update on local media stuff:

You can follow Edmonton media news on Twitter using the hashtag #yegmedia. For a great overview of the global media landscape, check out Mediagazer.

So, what have I missed? What’s new and interesting in the world of Edmonton media? Let me know!

You can see past Media Monday Edmonton entries here.

Edmonton Notes for 4/5/2015

Happy Easter! Here are my weekly Edmonton notes:

Headlines

i like how you can just pop up above the trees to get a shot
Photo taken with a DJI drone, by Paul, here’s another great one

Upcoming Events

Coffee
Credo Coffee, photo by Dave Sutherland

Edmonton Public Library (EPL) continues to write the book on innovation

Back in February I had the opportunity to attend a Lunch & Learn event at the Edmonton Public Library. I joined nearly two dozen Edmontonians at the Stanley Milner library downtown to find out more about EPL and what they have been working on. Pilar Martinez, EPL’s Deputy CEO and Tina Thomas, Director of Marketing & Fund Development at EPL, led us through a brief presentation about EPL’s history and then told us more about two key initiatives they are raising money for. We finished with a tour of the Makerspace.

Normally I’d start with a photo of the library, but instead I want to share this colorful application of EPL’s Spread the words brand.

EPL Parkade
EPL Parkade by Ian McKenzie

I’m a regular user of the library so I feel like I know it well. But I still learned quite a bit during the lunchtime session! “Our history is all about innovation,” Pilar told us. To gain a better understanding of that history, we watched this video which was made to celebrate EPL being named Library of the Year in 2014:

Being named “Library of the Year” is the equivalent of winning the Stanley Cup in the world of libraries. EPL is the first ever Canadian library to receive the accolade.

Technology

The library is about more than books. It has been for a long time.

If you take a look at the EPL website today you’ll find the Digital Content tab. That’s your gateway to a whole other world of resources, including e-books, audiobooks, magazines, databases, open data, online learning, and more. In fact, EPL says they offer more than 5 million digital resources.

Here are some of the ones I use most frequently:

I’m continually amazed that I can access these resources for free using my computer without ever having to step into a branch. And I’m barely scratching the surface of what’s available!

Makerspace

The other non-book resource that I use all the time is the Makerspace, especially now that it features two recording booths. You won’t find any books in the Makerspace, unless of course you print one using the Espresso Book Machine! It’s a place for technology, exploration, and fun. Graham and I meet there every week to record Mack & Cheese and we always find it busy and full of activity.

On the tour we learned about the space from Peter Schoenberg, EPL’s Manager of Digital Literacy and Web Services. He explained that the Makerspace offers tools and resources to help people learn about things like 3D printing, graphic design, and more. And while you could in theory use the resources there to start a business, you’d quickly outgrow the space (and EPL is happy to help you get to that point).

Inside you’ll find computers and workstations in an open concept. The space works well for hackathons! You’ll also find the aforementioned Espresso Book Machine and a green wall for photography and video work:

EPL Makerspace

There are three 3D printers (they had to add another recently to keep up with demand):

EPL Makerspace

There are a couple of gaming spaces with Xboxes and these incredible overhead cone speakers that keep the sound minimized to the local area:

EPL Makerspace

And there are two sound-proof recording booths with computers, mics, mixers, amps, and instruments:

EPL Makerspace

The Makerspace is an incredible resource and if you couldn’t tell, I’m a big fan. Check it out if you haven’t already done so! You can request a tour here.

Welcome Baby

One of the programs I didn’t know about before the luncheon was Welcome Baby, a program that puts books and early literacy resources in the hands of newborns and their parents. “A library card, books and story times are the first steps to a love of reading and success later in life.”

Through a partnership with AHS, the program is being brought to parents when they visit a clinic for their child’s two month immunizations. Babies also receive a library card, free of course. “Early literacy is the foundation and EPL is focused on it,” Pilar told us.

Each Welcome Baby Early Literacy Kit costs $25 and EPL is hoping to raise $1.5 million total. You can donate to Welcome Baby here.

epl2go

The other program we learned a lot about was epl2go, a new literacy van initiative. Before I spoil it, watch this entertaining promotional video:

The idea is actually an old one (EPL used to have book mobiles that would travel to different neighbourhoods). epl2go vans will bring programs and services from the library to Edmontonians who don’t have easy access to an existing branch. In today’s parlance, we might describe epl2go as a pop-up library!

EPL is looking to raise $1 million to have four epl2go vans – one for each quadrant of the city. You can donate to epl2go here.

Facelift and more for Stanley Milner downtown

Let’s face it, the Stanley Milner library downtown isn’t incredibly attractive. It certainly doesn’t fit with the Art Gallery of Alberta, the Winspear Centre, City Hall, and it’ll look even more out of place when the LRT starts running past the front door. It’s also not super functional, with poor connections to Churchill Station and an insanely congested sidewalk/bus stop out front. We’ve been talking about this for years in Edmonton, with ideas for renovations and updates frequently being proposed (here’s one from 2010 for instance).

Edmonton Downtown Library
Edmonton Downtown Library by IQRemix

The good news is that the building is going to be renewed thanks to Council’s decision to fund the $61.5 million project last December. The City is providing $51.5 million of that while EPL will need to fundraise the remaining $10 million. The goal is to open the doors of the new facility in late fall of 2018 so they’ll have to move quickly. EPL hasn’t yet figured out what the donation campaign will look like, but they’re working on it.

We’ll have to wait until the full plan for the building renewal is revealed to know everything that’s going to change, but we do know that internal systems will be upgraded so the library can achieve a LEED silver designation at minimum. We also learned at the luncheon that EPL intends to use the opportunity to greatly improve the utility of the interior of the building too, with lots of work spaces, meeting rooms, and other community facilities. And yes, the Makerspace will also receive upgrades and additions, like potentially a kitchen space.

Connect with the library

Check out @EPLdotCA on Twitter, edmontonpl on YouTube, and EPLdotCA on Facebook. If you don’t already have your free library card, you can learn how to get one here.

Media Monday Edmonton: Update #148

Here’s my latest update on local media stuff:

March 28 2015 Backstage Paula Kreba-5
Global Edmonton’s Quinn Ohler & Nancy Carlson were among the local media who walked at Western Canada Fashion Week

Metro Edmonton
Metro has an updated look

You can follow Edmonton media news on Twitter using the hashtag #yegmedia. For a great overview of the global media landscape, check out Mediagazer.

So, what have I missed? What’s new and interesting in the world of Edmonton media? Let me know!

You can see past Media Monday Edmonton entries here.

Edmonton Notes for 3/29/2015

Here are my weekly Edmonton notes:

Headlines

Cyclist, Jasper Avenue, March 22. 2015
This was just one week ago, photo by More Bike Lanes Please

Upcoming Events

March 27 Nyoluoch Fashion Paula Kreba-1
Western Canada Fashion Week

What does Alberta’s Budget 2015 mean for Edmonton?

Today was budget day in Alberta. Budget 2015 is being called “a bad news budget” but it could have been much worse. There are tax and user fee increases, cuts to spending (including the first cut to health spending in 20 years), and a new “Health Care Contribution Levy”, and still Alberta’s deficit will grow, to a record $5 billion this year. On the other hand, infrastructure spending seems to be mostly intact, programs for the most vulnerable have not been cut, Alberta retains its tax advantage, and the Province is taking some baby steps toward getting us off the energy price roller coaster. Here is Dave’s take.

Budget 2015

There’s a lot of truth to the “government town” label that people often apply to Edmonton, so any Provincial cuts are going to have an impact. According to the City’s chief economist John Rose, 22% of Edmonton’s employment is related to health care, education, or public administration.

Still, Rose said in recent weeks that Edmonton as a whole would weather the storm better than others in Alberta. From his Labour Force Report issued on March 13:

“Although the impact of lower oil prices is evident in some sectors, the diversity and depth of
Edmonton’s economy has insured that employment continues to grow in Edmonton and that the
City remains a very attractive location for those seeking new opportunities.”

So what does Budget 2015 mean for Edmontonians and for Edmonton?

Highlights

Here are some of the key takeaways from the budget that I think are relevant to Edmonton:

  • For 2015-2016, Alberta Health Services (AHS) faces a decrease of $286 million or 2.1% and will need to cut nearly 1,700 positions
  • The budget includes $926 million in capital spending for health-related “capacity expansion projects” in Calgary and Edmonton
  • There is $50 million over at least two years to renovate emergency rooms in Calgary and Edmonton (specifically the Misericordia, Grey Nuns, and Royal Alexandra hospitals)
  • The budget promises than 300 new restorative care beds in Calgary and Edmonton
  • Post-secondary institutions face $114 million in cuts
  • Campus Alberta institutions (which includes the University of Alberta) are facing a 1.4% operating grant reduction in 2015-2016 and a 2.7% reduction in 2016-2017
  • School boards will receive no money for more students and must cut 3% from non-instructional costs
  • The Province says that “most” school projects announced in 2013 and early 2014 will open in 2016-2017
  • Family and Community Support Services, which helps to fund more than 60 agencies and 80 programs in Edmonton, will be maintained at $76 million.
  • Funding for police remains the same
  • Capital spending of $1.1 billion for the next 5 years includes $124 million for NAIT expansion and $120 million for NorQuest downtown
  • GreenTRIP funding remains intact, which means the first portion of the Valley Line LRT will continue to move ahead
  • MSI funding will remain stable, even if it is more of a loan than a grant
  • The smart fare proposal from Edmonton, St. Albert, and Strathcona County is still “under consideration”
  • The budget contains no funding for the proposed Galleria project

Discussion

Certainly the health care sector is going to take a hit and that will have some impact on Edmonton. The Province maintains that we can get the same quality of service for less, while critics disagree and suggest the effect of this budget won’t be felt only by those at AHS who lose their jobs but also by Edmontonians in need of care. “The time has come for us to start looking at how we can do things in a more efficient manner,” said Health Minister Stephen Mandel. “I don’t think Albertans should have to pay 20 and 30 per cent more for things.”

In addition to the cuts in health-related spending, the budget also introduces the Health Care Contribution Levy, which will apply to individuals with taxable income greater than $50,000 per year. There’s a sliding scale from $200 to $1000 depending on your income bracket. This tax takes effect on July 1, 2015, and applies to roughly 1.1 million Albertans.

The health-related surprise though was money for hospitals, especially given recent suggestions that Edmonton facilities need more than $225 million in maintenance and repairs. The previously announced funding for emergency room upgrades will help in that regard.

It’s not clear how many cuts the education sector will face, but clearly the 3% reduction is going to have an impact. A lack of new funds to deal with growth will likely also mean larger class sizes. At the post-secondary level the cuts are much smaller than many expected.

While there is no provincial sales tax, there are increases to personal income taxes. If you make more than $100,000 per year your tax rate will increase from 10% to 11.5% (phased in over three years) and if you earn more than $250,000 your tax rate will rise to 12% when fully implemented (Edmonton’s media family income is about $100,000). We know that nearly 10,000 employees of AHS earn at least $100,000 a year, which means if they aren’t among the job cuts, they will face increased personal income tax. Though it likely won’t be those who make the most that face the cuts. According to the Herald, Mandel’s own department will spend 18% more than last year.

For most Edmontonians, increased taxes, fines, and user fees will be felt immediately. Gas taxes are increasing by 4 cents to 13 cents per litre. Cigarette taxes are increasing by $5 to $45 for a carton of 200. A bottle of wine or spirits will cost 16 cents more, and a 12-pack of beer will cost 90 cents more. Fines for speeding and other traffic offences are increasing by an average of 35%. Marriage licenses are increasing by $10 as are birth and death certificates.

There is some good news for the most vulnerable Edmontonians. There will be no reductions to child care subsidies for low-income families, nor are there any reductions to the Alberta Seniors Benefit income support. The budget will also accommodate growth for AISH and Persons with Development Disabilities. Starting July 1, 2016 there will also be a new Alberta Working Family Supplement refundable tax credit on earnings up to $41,220. Funding for FCSS, which supports many Edmonton agencies, will be maintained.

On infrastructure there’s mostly good news. Or at least a sigh of relief that important projects will continue moving forward, like the Valley Line LRT which the Province previously committed to.

Responses to Budget 2015

From Mayor Don Iveson:

“The city of Edmonton and Alberta municipalities faired reasonably well on this budget, all things considered – certainly compared to what we all heard and were concerned might be coming,” Iveson said.

“The numbers are fairly small and speaking to our chief economist just now, it may have a small effect on Edmonton’s growth, but we’re talking a decimal to Edmonton’s GDP, not a side-swipe,” Iveson said.

“We can work with the dollars provided,” said Iveson.

From Doug Goss, char of the University of Alberta’s board of governors:

“The message is clear — we all have to find new ways of doing business, we have to be a little more creative,” said Goss.

From Indira Samarasekera, President of the University of Alberta:

“This is a very good outcome,” said Samarasekera, “much better than many were expecting. The provincial government is facing financial pressures, but they’ve demonstrated they understand the importance of post-secondary to Alberta’s future.”

President Samarasekera will address the campus community at a forum on March 31.

From Michael Janz, Edmonton Public School Board chair:

“We’re going to see more students arriving at the school doorsteps with no new money provided to educate them,” he said. “I don’t think this is a good news budget for Edmonton public schools.”

From Marilyn Bergstra, vice-chair of Edmonton Catholic Schools:

“The budget cuts will make it increasingly difficult to support all of our students, particularly our most vulnerable, as well as the new students that are coming to our district,” she said.

From Helen Rice, President of the Alberta Urban Municipalities Association (AUMA):

“Sufficient funding for infrastructure is vital to address the deficit that has continued to grow across the province, and to provide for new infrastructure requirements to meet our obligations to citizens,” said Rice.

“Given the current economic climate, now is the time to secure funding to meet infrastructure needs when prices are falling and the availability of resources to work on projects is increasing,” said Rice.

The reaction from the business community appears to be more mixed.

Budget 2015

Budget 2015 Details

Here are all the budget-related news releases:

Here is the budget presentation from Robin Campbell, Minister of Finance:

You can also download the budget speech in PDF here. You can access the full list of budget documents here.

Roundup: Pre-Election Politics in Alberta

As you know I stay fairly focused on municipal issues, especially as they relate to Edmonton. But with the provincial budget set to be released on Thursday, a televised address from the Premier tonight, the review of the Municipal Government Act, and expectations of an imminent election, I’ve been thinking more about provincial politics lately. Here’s a brief summary and some thoughts on what I’ve been paying attention to.

Premier Prentice’s TV Address

Tonight, Premier Jim Prentice delivered a 16 minute address called Alberta Looks Ahead on CTV (which apparently cost between $80K and $100K). “We are a turning point in our province,” he said at the beginning. He described the need for “thoughtful decisions for the future” and said Albertans have told him they want balance.

The highlights as I understood them:

  • A 10 year plan will be introduced with the budget, with three pillars: strong fiscal foundation, building a lasting legacy, securing Alberta’s future
  • There will be no sales tax and Alberta will retain “the most competitive tax system in Canada”
  • The goal is to be back to a balanced budget by 2017
  • The government will hold the line on expenditures, which essentially means cuts in a growing province
  • Albertans will be asked “to contribute to the costs of the health system”, slowly at first but growing over time
  • By 2018-2019, 75% of energy revenue will go to program spending
  • By 2019-2020, 50% of energy revenue will go to program spending, with 25% going to emergency funds and paying down the debt and 25% going to the Heritage Savings Trust Fund

The Premier talked a lot about how he is determined to restore our commitment to the Heritage Fund, and said “paying off our debts is something we simply must do.” If I remember correctly, he mentioned only two former Premiers by name: Peter Lougheed and Ralph Klein.

Perhaps this is a more accurate, succinct recap courtesy of Marty Chan:

There were no “look in the mirror” comments tonight, but I did love the soundbite toward the end when Premier Prentice spoke about “a spirit of openness across every segment of Alberta”. He offered some examples, including “from bloggers to loggers,” which led to this gem:

Dave is probably the most well-known political blogger in the province. You can see his latest nomination update post here.

The Premier is also planning to host a series of Telephone Town Halls along with various Ministers, on March 25 and March 30. You can dial in toll-free at 1-855-269-4484. Tonight I saw many complaints about robocalls, so it’ll be interesting to see how those town halls are received.

Budget 2015 Consultations

The Province conducted an online survey for Budget 2015 and in total received 40,513 responses. The survey was open from February 5-28. Some of the key findings include:

  • 9 out of 10 respondents feel low oil prices will greatly or somewhat affect the Alberta government’s ability to budget
  • when asked what is the right balance to respond to the drop in revenue, Albertans were split almost evenly 3 ways between reducing spending, increasing revenue and running a deficit budget
  • 9 out of 10 respondents feel government needs to take action either immediately or within this year

I’m not sure how representative the results are, but it’s useful data to consider nonetheless. Budget 2015 will be released on Thursday, March 26.

Perhaps most interesting to me is that the survey results were made available through the Open Data Portal! This enables you to ask the hard questions, like: how long did the average person take to fill out the survey? The average length of time was 7 minutes, with the median at 11 minutes. Ignoring the records that were greater than 90 minutes (people leave tabs open all the time) here’s what the data looks like in a chart:

budget survey time taken

You can download all the data as a 13 MB Excel file. Give it a go and have some fun!

I hope this is a sign of things to come in terms of making information available through the open data catalogue in a timely fashion.

Municipal Government Act Amendments

Last week, the Government of Alberta tabled amendments to the Municipal Government Act. You can get a brief overview of what’s changing here. From the news release:

“The last major consolidation of the MGA took place in 1995, after nearly 10 years of review. The current MGA review began in 2012 and has involved input from more than 1,200 written submissions, and more than 1,500 people at 77 community meetings.”

A few of the proposed changes I found interesting:

  • Municipalities would be required to adopt public participation policies that outline their approaches for engaging with stakeholders. Edmonton already has a policy for this and is actively review and improving its approach to public engagement.
  • Existing petition requirements make it difficult to successfully petition a municipality, so one proposed changed would allow municipalities to change the rules for petitions.
  • Currently municipalities need to use snail mail or newspapers to notify the public about things like bylaws and public hearings, but this is 2015! The proposed change would make it possible for municipalities to announce notifications online or using other methods as they see fit.
  • Another change would require municipalities to adopt three-year operating plans and five-year capital plans. Edmonton is already moving in this direction.
  • Municipalities are currently required to have statutory plans, but there is no explicit hierarchy specified, they simply need to be consistent with one another. The proposed change is to identify the hierarchy and relationship of those plans. In Edmonton, this could impact The Way Ahead.
  • Another change would allow for the creation of civic charters, which the Province, Edmonton, and Calgary have already been pursuing.

There are more amendments still to come. Additional review and consultation will take place this spring with the goal of proclaiming the fully revised MGA and regulatory updates by the end of 2016.

MSI Funding (March 2015)

Another pre-election, pre-budget announcement was about the allocation of $400 million in MSI funding. Edmonton is slated to receive just over $80 million out of that, which is less than half of what the City was expecting for 2015.

“Until we get the provincial budget, I won’t know how much additional dollars are available and we won’t be able to make any decisions about which projects go ahead until we see the provincial budget,” said Mayor Don Iveson.

For its part, the Liberals have called the MSI announcement “an elaborate ruse” due to some creative accounting with the Basic Municipal Transportation Grant.

Wildrose Leadership Race

Also tonight, we held our third #abvote Hangout at http://abvote.ca. In addition to Dave, Ryan, and myself, we had the three Wildrose leadership candidates join us: Drew Barnes (MLA for Cypress-Medicine Hat), Derek Fildebrandt sitting in for Brian Jean (Former MP for Fort McMurray - Athabasca) and Linda Osinchuk (Former Mayor for Strathcona County). We started with a discussion about the Premier’s address, and then moved on to some other questions for the candidates.

You can watch the archived video on YouTube or here:

I asked a question about how they’d support municipalities, and of course the Wildrose 10/10 plan came up, which would allocate 10% of tax revenues and 10% of surpluses to municipalities.

They’re rushing this race, but with speculation the writ will drop on March 30, they don’t have much of a choice. You can learn more about how voting works for the leadership race here. The Wildrose party will announce its next leader on March 28 in Calgary.

Other

I have already mentioned these things in previous roundups but it’s worth linking to them again:

That’s it for now! Stay tuned for our next Hangout and follow all the latest stuff online using #ableg and #abvote. Now I guess I had better go update the Election Results dashboard

Media Monday Edmonton: Update #147

Here’s my latest update on local media stuff:

You can follow Edmonton media news on Twitter using the hashtag #yegmedia. For a great overview of the global media landscape, check out Mediagazer.

So, what have I missed? What’s new and interesting in the world of Edmonton media? Let me know!

You can see past Media Monday Edmonton entries here.

Edmonton Notes for 3/22/2015

Here are my weekly Edmonton notes:

Headlines

METRO INE MACAWAN STATION
Metro Line MacEwan Station, photo by Jason Woodhead

Upcoming Events

DSC_0002
Is it winter or spring? Photo by Bill Burris