Posts Tagged: law

Patent for podcasting? Seriously?

A company you’ve probably never heard of before announced today that it has been awarded a patent on podcasting. VoloMedia was awarded U.S. Patent 7,568,213  titled "Method for Providing Episodic Media" yesterday. I think the fact that VoloMedia’s Murgesh Navar posted an entry defending the patent before anyone even knew about it underscores just how… Reads more »

Northern Voice 2009: Borrowed Content

I did a presentation today at Northern Voice in the “bootcamp” stream called Borrowed Content: What’s OK, What’s Not. The session was intended to cover the basics of copyright, fair use, and Creative Commons for bloggers. I didn’t really know how advanced the audience would be, so I decided to keep things simple. I didn’t… Reads more »

Speeding just isn’t what it used to be!

Normally when I hear someone talking about GPS, I think directions. You know, the gadget you have in your car that tells you where to turn left. Like most electronics however, there are cheap GPS units and top-of-the-line GPS units. Like the one Shaun Malone’s parents installed in his car: GPS tracking systems like the… Reads more »

Thoughts on Capitol v. Thomas

Record labels have filed over 20,000 lawsuits related to file sharing since 2003, and the first one to go to trial received a verdict yesterday in Minnesota. The jury found defendant Jammie Thomas guilty and ordered her to pay the six record companies that sued her $9,250 for each of the 24 songs they decided… Reads more »

DMCA and DRM: Dumb and Dumber

On Wednesday I wrote that the writing is on the wall for DRM. Today over at ars technica, Ken Fisher agrees: What makes it even more deplorable this time is that it’s now 2007, and the writing is on the wall: DRM is a failed idea, and a waste of time and money. I don’t… Reads more »

Podcasting Legal Guide

A new legal guide for podcasting has been released at the Creative Common site with the purpose of providing “a general roadmap of some of the legal issues specific to podcasting.” The document is quite lengthly, and while I haven’t read through it all, I did notice that it only applies to US law: This… Reads more »

Net Neutrality

I haven’t said much about so-called “network neutrality” yet, but I do think it is a very important issue. I don’t pretend to know all about it, but I have read enough to form some opinions. First off, here’s how the term is defined at Wikipedia: Network neutrality is a proposed principle of network regulation…. Reads more »

World War 3.0

Even though the Microsoft anti-trust trial finished quite a while ago, I just finished reading Ken Auletta’s book on the famous case, World War 3.0: Microsoft and its Enemies. As someone who followed the case quite closely (I’m a geek, what can I say?) I can honestly say the only new stuff in the book… Reads more »

Is using open Wi-Fi against the law?

You might have heard in the news recently that “wardriving”, or using someone’s open wireless connection from your car, is once again a hot topic. It seems that a man in Florida was arrested for “hacking” into an open network connection from his vehicle. Here’s what the folks an Engadget had to say: If stories… Reads more »

Today’s Digital Legalities

Some notes from the digital law session hosted by Denise Howell, Buzz Bruggeman, and Jason Calacanis: Very cool website that lets you subscribe to new patents: PatentMojo. Denise: Law firms are starting to wise up to the fact that maybe they need to look at communication differently, and blogging is leading the charge. Jason: If… Reads more »