Edmonton & Winnipeg Fringe Festivals break records in 2009

The final numbers for the 28th Edmonton International Fringe Theatre Festival were released yesterday: a record-breaking 92,279 tickets were sold over 11 days. Less than a month ago, the Winnipeg Fringe Theatre Festival announced that it had sold 81,565 tickets over 12 days, a new record at the time for fringe festivals in North America. Edmonton held the previous record – 77,700 tickets in 2006.

Clearly, this year has been a good one for North America’s two largest fringe festivals. Being the stats junkie that I am, I decided to look up the ticket sales for Edmonton and Winnipeg in recent years. I was able to find solid numbers for 2002 onward:

These numbers come from newspaper articles as well as press releases from the festivals themselves. There are a few minor discrepancies depending on which source you look at. For example, this year’s numbers for Winnipeg are inconsistent – the official site says 81,353 but all the media articles say 81,565. I went with the number I saw most often.

In tabular form:

Year Edmonton Winnipeg
2009 92279 81565
2008 77204 72722
2007 74693 71921
2006 77700 69320
2005 70700 66315
2004 60442 68470
2003 68000 67002
2002 68925 62801

I’m sure there’s a spreadsheet of ticket sales for all of the Canadian fringe festivals somewhere, but I haven’t been able to track it down (looking at you CAFF). I wanted to see how Edmonton and Winnipeg compared with other cities in Canada. It didn’t take long to find the numbers for 2007, which while slightly out of date, give you an idea of the relative size of each festival:

The red area is the metro population for each city, to show how big each festival is relative to the overall population. Edmonton and Winnipeg are clearly in a class of their own!

I look forward to the fringe each year, and I’m obviously not the only one. Here’s to hoping the friendly competition between Edmonton and Winnipeg continues to benefit both cities for years to come!

State of the Calgary Twittersphere – July 2009

Welcome to the fifth State of the Calgary Twittersphere, my look at the intersection of Twitter and Calgary. You can see last month’s stats here.

Apologies for the delay in getting this one posted. The source of the data this month has changed, slightly. In addition to Twitter Search, I added more data directly from Twitter itself. A total of 16,082 tweets were pulled from user timelines directly because they did not exist in Twitter Search.

User identification remains the same. If a user has his or her location set to Calgary, Airdrie, Okotoks, Cochrane, Strathmore, or matching lat/long coordinates, they are considered a Calgarian. If a tweet is “about Calgary” it contains either the word Calgary, the #yyc hashtag, or both.

For July 2009:

# of local users: 6626 (an increase of 980 from June)

To clarify, that means there were 6626 users who posted at least one tweet in July 2009 with their location set to something that makes them an Calgarian as described above. This number should be treated as a minimum – there are probably many more Calgary users without their location set or that were not captured for some other reason.

I’m happy with my previous stats posts existing as point-in-time snapshots. That said, I am continually improving my data set, making it more accurate over time. I am still happy with the numbers I posted for March through May – they are reasonably accurate (within about 100 users). The number I posted for June however, 5646 users, is not accurate. It was actually 6506, which means this month actually increased by 120 users (however I left the 980 above for consistency).

Here are the rest of the stats for July 2009:

# of tweets by local users: 238525
# of tweets by local users containing #yyc: 5028 (2.1%)
# of tweets by local users that were replies: 72969 (30.6%)
# of tweets by local users containing links: 58297 (24.4%)
# of tweets by local users that were retweets: 7713 (3.2%)
# of tweets by local users that were twooshes: 8159 (3.4%)

Here are the numbers above in graphic form:

Here are the top clients used by local users for posting updates. You’ll notice that API is now identified separately from web:

Some other interesting stats for the month:

Analysis

There wasn’t much growth in July, which isn’t altogether surprising considering it’s the summer. I suspect things will pick up again in the fall. I’m still fascinated by the difference in tagged tweets between Calgary and Edmonton (you can see Edmonton’s stats for July here).

Since I started recording the stats for Calgary back in March, I have identified just over 12,500 local users. The number above, 6626, is how many of them were active in July.

Twestival Local is happening in Calgary on September 12th! Click here for more info.

State of the Edmonton Twittersphere – July 2009

Welcome to the seventh State of the Edmonton Twittersphere, my look at the intersection of Twitter and Edmonton. You can see last month’s stats here.

The source of the data this month has changed, slightly. In addition to Twitter Search, I added more data directly from Twitter itself. A total of 19,199 tweets were pulled from user timelines directly because they did not exist in Twitter Search.

User identification remains the same. If a user has his or her location set to Edmonton, St. Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Stony Plain, Fort Saskatchewan, Beaumont, Spruce Grove, or matching lat/long coordinates, they are considered an Edmontonian.

For July 2009:

# of local users: 5133 (an increase of 1491 from June)

To clarify, that means there were 5133 users who posted at least one tweet in July 2009 with their location set to something that makes them an Edmontonian as described above. This number should be treated as a minimum – there are probably many more Edmonton users without their location set.

I’m happy with my previous stats posts existing as point-in-time snapshots. That said, I am continually improving my data set, making it more accurate over time. I am still happy with the numbers I posted for January through May – they are reasonably accurate (within about 100 users). The number I posted for June however, 3642 users, is not accurate. It was actually 4581, which means this month actually increased by 552 users (however I left the 1491 above for consistency).

Here’s a graph to illustrate local user growth in 2009:

Here are the rest of the stats for July 2009:

# of tweets by local users: 210162
# of tweets by local users containing #yeg: 12879 (6.1%)
# of tweets by local users that were replies: 73119 (34.8%)
# of tweets by local users containing links: 43702 (20.8%)
# of tweets by local users that were retweets: 8393 (4.0%)
# of tweets by local users that were twooshes: 7185 (3.4%)

Once again, the number of tweets containing #yeg actually includes all local hashtags, such as #yegtransit or #yegfood (though most often they are used together anyway).

Here are the numbers above in graphic form (not corrected for June):

Here are the top clients used by local users for posting updates. You’ll notice that API is now identified separately from web:

Some other interesting stats for the month:

Finally, here are the top ten users in Edmonton by followers (most followers first): Pat_Lorna, revtrev, DrBarryLycka, LesM, subunit1, garrymullen, redneckmommy, mastermaq, NHL_Oilers, dan_cote.

Analysis

Looks like we’re getting some growth again, which is a little surprising considering it’s the summer. A couple of things helped to boost July’s stats, including the City Centre Airport issue and the big summer storms. I counted 1464 tweets posted by local users with the #ecca hashtag in July, and I already posted some stats on the storm here. Additionally, July 8th (which is when the Council meeting on the airport was held) was the second busiest day of the month.

Since January, I have identified just over 9200 local users. The number above, 5133, is how many of them were active in July.

I’ll post the Calgary stats as soon as I can – still some manual processing to do, so it might be next week before I get it all finished.

Attendance Numbers for Edmonton’s Capital EX

Edmonton’s Capital EX wrapped up yesterday. Sharon and I visited on Thursday evening and had a good time. Today Northlands released the attendance numbers, and though slightly lower than previous years, the ten-day festival still recorded an impressive 717,966 visits. I had been looking forward to the final numbers, so that I could compare it with previous years.

Here are the attendance numbers for the last ten years (you can download the raw data below):

Though much of the data is missing, I was able to track down some numbers going all the way back to 1879:

After getting this information, I decided to compare it to the population of Edmonton for the same time periods. Here is the comparison for the last ten years:

And the same comparison starting in 1879:

 

A couple things to note about the data in this post:

  • The event changed from Klondike Days (adopted in 1962) to Capital EX in 2006. This explains the large drop that year.
  • The event was a six-day fair from 1912 to 1967, and a ten-day fair thereafter (I think, certainly for the last 20 years or so it has been). I haven’t adjusted the figures for this.
  • The population data, which comes from the City of Edmonton, doesn’t account for surrounding communities.

Download the Capital EX Attendance & Edmonton Population data in CSV

Sources: iNews880, CBC, Edmonton Journal, Amusement Business (1, 2, 3, 4), City of Edmonton, Capital EX Fair History

State of the Calgary Twittersphere – June 2009

Welcome to the fourth State of the Calgary Twittersphere, my look at the intersection of Twitter and Calgary. You can see last month’s stats here.

The source of the data this month remains the same – Twitter Search. If a user has his or her location set to Calgary, Airdrie, Okotoks, Cochrane, Strathmore, or matching lat/long coordinates, they are considered a Calgarian. If a tweet is “about Calgary” it contains either the word Calgary, the #yyc hashtag, or both.

For June 2009:

# of local users: 5646 (a decrease of 215 from May)

To clarify, that means there were 5646 users who posted at least one tweet in June 2009 with their location set to something that makes them a Calgarian as described above. This number should be treated as a minimum – there are probably many more Calgary users without their location set or that were not captured for some other reason. See additional analysis below.

# of tweets by local users: 207245
# of tweets by local users containing #yyc: 4269 (2.1%)
# of tweets by local users that were replies: 68737 (33.2%)
# of tweets by local users containing links: 48114 (23.2%)
# of tweets by local users that were retweets: 6637 (3.2%)
# of tweets by local users that were twooshes: 8865 (4.3%)

Here are the numbers above in graphic form:

Here are the top clients used by local users for posting updates (remember that web includes all unidentified API calls too). A notable new entry is UberTwitter:

Since I’ve been playing with some temperature data from Environment Canada lately, I decided to plot the average temperature against the number of tweets for each day in June:

Do people tweet more when it’s colder outside? I’m not sure the graph really tells us. What’s clear however is that people tweet less on the weekends!

Some other interesting stats for the month:

Finally, here are the top ten users in Calgary by followers (most followers first): douglasi, OksanaIrwin, ahhhgolf, twitty7x, strategicsense, CrazyMechanic, broatch, nolanmatthias, ThankASoldier, tessaru

Analysis

Like the Edmonton stats for this month, the Calgary stats don’t look that impressive. Some people have abandoned Twitter, it’s the summer, and as was pointed out in the comments on the Edmonton post, the Iran Election probably impacted my stats as some users changed their location to Tehran.

There are some encouraging signs, however. The increase in tagged tweets this month surprised me – maybe #yyc will try to catch up to #yeg! Also, since I started recording the stats for Calgary back in March, I have identified just over 11,000 local users. The number above, 5646, is how many of them were active in June.

I didn’t monitor things as closely in June as I do normally, so there’s a chance I might not have captured all of the data. In particular, I’m not sure if June 13th/14th was really that low or if there was a data import error of some kind. Either way, I think the data above represents the overall trends accurately.

I’ll be making some changes to hopefully boost the accuracy of the numbers in July.

State of the Edmonton Twittersphere – June 2009

Welcome to the sixth State of the Edmonton Twittersphere, my look at the intersection of Twitter and Edmonton. You can see last month’s stats here.

The source of the data this month remains the same – Twitter Search. If a user has his or her location set to Edmonton, St. Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Stony Plain, Fort Saskatchewan, Beaumont, Spruce Grove, or matching lat/long coordinates, they are considered an Edmontonian. If a tweet is “about Edmonton” it contains either the word Edmonton, the #yeg hashtag, or both.

For June 2009:

# of local users: 3642 (a decrease of 871 from May)

To clarify, that means there were 3642 users who posted at least one tweet in June 2009 with their location set to something that makes them an Edmontonian as described above. This number should be treated as a minimum – there are probably many more Edmonton users without their location set. See additional analysis below.

# of tweets by local users: 172295
# of tweets by local users containing #yeg: 9411 (5.5%)
# of tweets by local users that were replies: 64281 (37.3%)
# of tweets by local users containing links: 31937 (18.5%)
# of tweets by local users that were retweets: 7532 (4.4%)
# of tweets by local users that were twooshes: 6453 (3.7%)

Once again, the number of tweets containing #yeg actually includes all local hashtags, such as #yegtransit or #yegfood (though most often they are used together anyway).

Here are the numbers above in graphic form:

Here are the top clients used by local users for posting updates (remember that web includes all unidentified API calls too, though they are changing that). A notable new entry this month is UberTwitter:

I’ve been playing with some temperature data from Environment Canada lately, and it occurred to me that I could visualize it against my Twitter data. Here is the number of tweets posted and the average temperature for each day in June:

Do people post more when it’s warmer or when it’s colder? The only thing I can be sure of is that there are always less tweets posted on the weekend. Beyond that, there seemed to be more tweets posted at the beginning of the month when temperatures were cooler, but obviously this is in no way scientific!

Some other interesting stats for the month:

Finally, here are the top ten users in Edmonton by followers (most followers first): Pat_Lorna, revtrev, LesM, subunit1, garrymullen, mastermaq, redneckmommy, NHL_Oilers, karlkovacs, dan_cote. It would take a lot more time to generate, but a top ten list ranked by local followers would probably look much different.

Analysis

This month’s stats don’t look very good! The numbers haven’t been this low since March. There are definitely users who have abandoned Twitter, but I think the time of year probably has an effect as well. Presumably people are outside enjoying the weather, tweeting less often! A preliminary look at the numbers for July suggests to expect more of the same for next month’s stats.

The good news is that since January, I have identified nearly 9000 local users. The number above, 3642, is how many of them were active in June.

I didn’t monitor things as closely in June as I do normally, so there’s a chance I might not have captured all of the data. In particular, I’m not sure if June 14th was really that low or if there was a data import error of some kind. Either way, I think the data above represents the overall trends accurately.

I should have the stats for Calgary up by Thursday. Stay tuned!

UPDATE: The Calgary stats for June are here.

Airport Passenger Statistics for Edmonton & Calgary

Earlier this evening I was a guest on The Lesley Primeau Show on 630 CHED. Along with Brittney, we talked about Twitter. That went pretty much as expected – Lesley doesn’t hate social media, but she doesn’t get it either.

While waiting for the show to get started, we were talking about the Edmonton City Centre Airport (ECCA). I’m in favor of closing “the muni” while Lesley very clearly favors the status quo, or perhaps even restoring scheduled service to ECCA. She feels that Edmonton needs an airport downtown to become a great city – I think we need density in the centre, not an airport.

Things got slightly heated when Lesley said that the only growth the Edmonton International Airport (EIA) has seen was from the consolidation back in 1995. She also said that EIA will never rival the Calgary International Airport, and that growth there has been far stronger. I challenged her on both of these assertions (and have heard others make them recently). Lesley said I needed to do my homework, that I was wrong.

So I did my homework. I wasn’t wrong.

Let’s start with the first myth – that EIA’s growth has only come at the expense of ECCA. Here are the annual passenger numbers for each airport from 1995 to 2008 (I’m going with scheduled passenger numbers, which is why ECCA is 0 after 1996):

Here they are in table format:

YEAR EIA ECCA
1995 1943797 835612
1996 3104322 417002
1997 3720623 0
1998 3791574 0
1999 3700016 0
2000 3843321 0
2001 3940416 0
2002 3773800 0
2003 3882497 0
2004 4081565 0
2005 4511451 0
2006 5213992 0
2007 6065117 0
2008 6437334 0

What can learn from those numbers? The key years are 1995-97, obviously (the plebiscite vote took place on October 16, 1995). Passenger traffic at EIA, which had been stagnant since the early 1980s at about 2 million passengers per year, increased by more than the amount that passenger traffic at ECCA decreased. Passenger traffic at ECCA decreased by 835,612 from 1995 to 1997, while passenger traffic at EIA increased by 1,776,826.

Clearly there was something besides consolidation that caused traffic at EIA to increase. Growth at EIA leveled off from 1998 until 2002, but you’ll recall that was a difficult time for the airline industry – Edmonton was not alone.

Now let’s look at the second myth – that Edmonton will always be second to Calgary. Here are the annual passenger numbers for EIA and YYC from 1996 to 2008:

Here they are in table format:

YEAR EIA YYC
1996 3104322 6967571
1997 3720623 7547156
1998 3791574 7731034
1999 3700016 8010883
2000 3843321 8090426
2001 3940416 7794519
2002 3773800 7884194
2003 3882497 8576541
2004 4081565 9174039
2005 4511451 10148718
2006 5213992 11279080
2007 6065117 12265754
2008 6437334 12507111

Calgary is definitely busier than Edmonton – nearly twice as busy. Edmonton is in a better position today relative to Calgary than it was in 1996, however. It’s a little difficult to tell from the graph/table above, but Edmonton’s growth overall since 1996 is actually stronger than Calgary’s. Here are the annual percentage increases:

In total, passenger traffic at EIA has increased 107% since 1996, whereas passenger traffic at YYC has increased 80% since 1996.

Is that enough to suggest that Edmonton can emerge from the shadow of Calgary, at least when it comes to their respective airports? Maybe, maybe not. But the data clearly shows that YYC isn’t light years beyond EIA as some would like to suggest.

As an aside, while doing my research I found statistics for EIA for three more years: 394000 in 1962, 755000 in 1973, and 1100000 in 1974.

The public hearing on the City Centre Airport continues tomorrow at City Hall. You can see my resources post here.

Sources: EIA Website, EIA Passenger Statistics, YYC Website, Calgary Airport Statistics, numerous EIA press releases, Wikipedia, Tourism Calgary.

State of the Calgary Twittersphere – May 2009

Welcome to the third State of the Calgary Twittersphere, my look at the intersection of Twitter and Calgary. You can see last month’s stats here. Apologies for posting this so far into June, but my travelling over the last few weeks made it difficult to do. Better late than never!

The source of the data this month remains the same – Twitter Search. If a user has his or her location set to Calgary, Airdrie, Okotoks, Cochrane, Strathmore, or matching lat/long coordinates, they are considered a Calgarian. If a tweet is “about Calgary” it contains either the word Calgary, the #yyc hashtag, or both.

I’m not sure what happened on May 15th, but I seem to be missing data for that day (the same system imports data for both Calgary and Edmonton, and the Edmonton stats were unaffected).

For May 2009:

# of local users: 5861 (an increase of 210 over April)

To clarify, that means there were 5861 users who posted at least one tweet in May 2009 with their location set to something that makes them a Calgarian as described above. This number should be treated as a minimum – there are probably many more Calgary users without their location set or that were not captured for some other reason.

# of tweets by local users: 209260
# of tweets by local users containing #yyc: 3228 (1.5%)
# of tweets by local users that were replies: 74979 (35.8%)
# of tweets by local users containing links: 43354 (20.7%)
# of tweets by local users that were retweets: 6593 (3.2%)
# of tweets by local users that were twooshes: 9459 (4.5%)

Here are the numbers above in graphic form:

Here are the number of local users created per day in May, using the best available data from Twitter (it seems to be really unreliable, I will probably drop this stat next month):

Here are the top clients used by local users for posting updates (remember that web includes all unidentified API calls too):

Some other interesting stats for the month:

  • The ten most active local users (most tweets first): mrrocknroll, burstingenergy, C_DIG, strategicsense, birdalert, wikkiwild1, bish0p, aprilcandy70, SalBarguil, iKasperr
  • Just over 52% of all local tweets were posted between 9 AM and 5 PM.
  • Local users posted roughly 4.7 tweets per minute in May, compared with 4.6 per minute in April.
  • The day with the most local tweets posted was May 5th at 9114. On average, 6824 local tweets were posted each day (compared to 6561 in April).
  • Of the 74979 replies posted by local users this month, 16327 or 22% were to other local users.
  • A total of 847 users posted 50 times or more in May. In comparison, 1085 users posted just once.

Here are the ten most replied to local users for May: C_DIG, mrrocknroll, ubershmoo, caninez, amacisaac, jonincalgary, aNorthernSoul, eviltera, darylcognito, CdnCowgirl

Analysis

Like the Edmonton stats for May, it might appear at first as though Twitter growth in Calgary has stagnated. Instead, I think there’s just some attrition taking place. There were 1879 users who posted at least one tweet in May that did not post a tweet in April (so presumably they are new). Likewise, there were 1635 users who posted at least one tweet in April that did not post a tweet in May (so presumably they abandoned the service).

In total, I have identified just over 8000 local users since March – the number above, 5861, is how many of them are currently active.

State of the Edmonton Twittersphere – May 2009

Welcome to the fifth State of the Edmonton Twittersphere, my look at the intersection of Twitter and Edmonton. You can see last month’s stats here. Apologies for posting this so far into June, but my travelling over the last few weeks made it difficult to do. Better late than never!

The source of the data this month remains the same – Twitter Search. If a user has his or her location set to Edmonton, St. Albert, Sherwood Park, Leduc, Nisku, Stony Plain, Fort Saskatchewan, Beaumont, Spruce Grove, or matching lat/long coordinates, they are considered an Edmontonian. If a tweet is “about Edmonton” it contains either the word Edmonton, the #yeg hashtag, or both.

For May 2009:

# of local users: 4513 (an increase of just 24 users over April, see analysis below)

To clarify, that means there were 4513 users who posted at least one tweet in May 2009 with their location set to something that makes them an Edmontonian as described above. This number should be treated as a minimum – there are probably many more Edmonton users without their location set.

# of tweets by local users: 197713
# of tweets by local users containing #yeg: 10709 (5.4%)
# of tweets by local users that were replies: 72789 (36.8%)
# of tweets by local users containing links: 34315 (17.4%)
# of tweets by local users that were retweets: 8833 (4.5%)
# of tweets by local users that were twooshes: 7804 (3.9%)

Once again, the number of tweets containing #yeg actually includes all local hashtags, such as #yegtransit or #yegfood (though most often they are used together anyway).

Here are the numbers above in graphic form:

Here are the number of local users created per day in May, using the best available data from Twitter (it seems to be really unreliable, I will probably drop this stat next month):

Here are the top clients used by local users for posting updates (remember that web includes all unidentified API calls too):

Some other interesting stats for the month:

  • The ten most active local users (most tweets first): akomuzikera, wickedmickey, DebraWard, Etown_Jenn, TrinaMLee, fcedmonton, AndyGroenink, paulagroenink, Sirthinks, SheilaEthier.
  • Just over 52% of all local tweets were posted between 9 AM and 5 PM.
  • Local users posted roughly 4.4 tweets per minute in May, compared with 4.3 per minute in April.
  • The day with the most local tweets posted was May 26th at 8190, a new record for Edmonton. On average, 6378 local tweets were posted each day (compared with 6134 in April).
  • Of the 72789 replies posted by local users this month, 26670 or 37% were to other local users.
  • A total of 837 local users posted 50 times or more this month. In comparison, 812 local users posted just once this month.

Here are the ten most replied to local users for May: britl, akomuzikera, foomanizer, Sirthinks, ZoomJer, bingofuel, angelzilla, mzflip82, frostedbetty, JodieGiese.

Analysis

It looks as though Twitter growth in Edmonton has come to a halt – the number of users who posted something this month only increased by 24 over last month! Clearly more than 24 local users signed up for Twitter last month, however. I think what’s actually happening is that a sizeable number of local users have abandoned Twitter.

There were 1387 users who posted at least one tweet in May that did not post a tweet in April (so presumably they are new). Likewise, there were 1306 users who posted at least one tweet in April that did not post a tweet in May (so presumably they abandoned the service). The difference is larger than 24 because I have better information about the April stats than I did a month ago, but for simplicity, I compare above to the number from last month’s post.

In total, I have identified nearly 7000 local users since January – the number above, 4513, is how many of them are currently active.

I’ll be posting the May stats for Calgary in the next couple days. Stay tuned!

UPDATE: You can see the Calgary stats for May here.

State of the Calgary Twittersphere – April 2009

Welcome to the second State of the Calgary Twittersphere, my look at the intersection of Twitter and Calgary. You can see last month’s stats here.

The source of the data this month remains the same – Twitter Search. If a user has his or her location set to Calgary, Airdrie, Okotoks, Cochrane, Strathmore, or matching lat/long coordinates, they are considered a Calgarian. If a tweet is “about Calgary” it contains either the word Calgary, the #yyc hashtag, or both.

As you’ll see in a couple of the graphs below, Twitter Search was down for just over 3 hours on April 19th (from about 8:48 PM until 11:51 PM MST), so tweets posted during that period of time were not counted.

For April 2009:

# of local users: 5651 (an increase of 52% over March)

To clarify, that means there were 5651 users who posted at least one tweet in April 2009 with their location set to something that makes them a Calgarian as described above. This number should be treated as a minimum – there are probably many more Calgary users without their location set or that were not captured for some other reason.

# of tweets by local users: 196832
# of tweets by local users containing #yyc: 3107 (1.6%)
# of tweets by local users that were replies: 68157 (34.6%)
# of tweets by local users containing links: 37838 (19.2%)
# of tweets by local users that were retweets: 6373 (3.2%)
# of tweets by local users that were twooshes: 7894 (4.0%)

This graph shows these numbers visually:

Here are the number of local users created per day in April, using the best available data from Twitter (the spike is about the time Oprah joined):

Here are the top clients used by local users for posting updates (remember that web includes all unidentified API calls too):

Some other interesting stats for the month:

  • The ten most active local users (most tweets first): strategicsense, codsta, Somecitygirl, izzynobre, C_DIG, aNorthernSoul, mrrocknroll, opiatedsherpa, wikkiwild1, caninez
  • About 51% of all local tweets were posted between 9 AM and 5 PM.
  • Local users posted roughly 4.6 tweets per minute in April, compared with 3.3 per minute in March.
  • The day with the most local tweets posted was April 22nd at 9163. On average, 6561 local tweets were posted each day (compared to 4760 in March).
  • Of the 68157 replies posted by local users this month, 17250 or 25% were to other local users.
  • A total of 893 local users posted 50 times or more this month. In comparison, 926 local users posted just once this month.

I’m not including the top ten users by # of followers this month because I haven’t been able to update it yet, and I suspect it hasn’t changed much anyway. Instead, here are the ten “most replied to” local users for April 2009: C_DIG, caninez, Somecitygirl, darylcognito, ReaFaceToFace, djkelly, amacisaac, Wendy, CdnCowgirl, jonincalgary. This stat obviously skews toward the chatty, but it’s interesting nonetheless.

If you have any comments or feedback let me know so that I can improve these statistics in future months. You can see the April 2009 stats for Edmonton here. I should have a Calgary vs. Edmonton stats post up sometime next week.