State of the Edmonton Twittersphere – September 2010

Welcome to the ninth State of the Edmonton Twittersphere for 2010, my look at the intersection of Twitter and Edmonton, AB. You can see the stats for August here.

For information on the data, definitions, and other background, click here.

For September 2010:

# of local users: 9188 (an increase of 700 from August)
# of tweets by local users: 503471
# of tweets by local users containing #yeg: 39862 (7.9%)
# of tweets by local users that were replies: 178519 (35.5%)
# of tweets by local users containing links: 131229 (26.1%)
# of tweets by local users that were retweets: 34503 (6.9%)
# of tweets by local users that were twooshes: 16028 (3.2%)

Here are the numbers above in graphic form:

Here are the top clients used by local users for posting updates:

Some other interesting stats for the month:

  • Just under 51% of all local tweets were posted between 9 AM and 5 PM.
  • Local users posted roughly 11.7 tweets per minute in September (compared to 10.8 tweets per minute in August).
  • The day with the most local tweets posted was September 23 at 21096. On average, 16783 local tweets were posted each day (compared to 15536 in August).
  • Of the 178519 replies posted by local users this month, 69081 or 38.7% were to other local users.
  • A total of 1904 users posted 50 times or more in September. In comparison, 1233 users posted just once.

 

Here are the top ten most active local users (not including bots):

  1. rootnl2k
  2. Lekordable
  3. DWsBITCH
  4. DJPh03NiX
  5. SaySandra
  6. confessionality
  7. TRENCHBABE
  8. ZoomJer
  9. CommonSenseSoc
  10. Tucktovich

Here are the top ten most active local users using #yeg (not including bots):

  1. Edmontonsun
  2. edmontonjournal
  3. Sirthinks
  4. iNews880
  5. ctvedmonton
  6. cbcedmonton
  7. DebraWard
  8. mastermaq
  9. BodyArchitects
  10. edmfilmfest

Here are the top ten most replied to local users:

  1. PoisonLolita
  2. ZoomJer
  3. confessionality
  4. SaySandra
  5. Wildsau
  6. CommonSenseSoc
  7. britl
  8. RockstarJodie
  9. KikkiPlanet
  10. Sirthinks

Here are the top ten most retweeted local users (by other local users):

  1. edmontonjournal
  2. mastermaq
  3. TrafficEdmonton
  4. CityofEdmonton
  5. ctvedmonton
  6. dantencer
  7. NHL_Oilers
  8. bingofuel
  9. Paulatics
  10. iNews880

Final Thoughts

I’m not sure why there was a bit of a jump in users and in the number of tweets posted in September, except perhaps that people go from “summer” mode to “get down to business” mode. Interest in the upcoming election made have played a role as well.

As with the previous month, the number of retweets includes both new and old style, both with and without extra comments.

Slowly catching up on my stats – I should have the rest of 2010 up soon.

As always, keep in mind that the stats above rely upon users setting the location field of their profile to something like “Edmonton”. Users who leave that field blank or who put something like “Canada” are not reflected in the above stats. More Information.

Northlands by the numbers

Today Northlands made a presentation to City Council. Chair Andrew Huntley and President Richard Andersen talked about the impact that the organization has in Edmonton, and answered questions related to the proposed downtown arena. Here’s an at-a-glance look at Northlands:

Most of those numbers come from the 2009 Northlands Annual Report (PDF). Northlands breaks its business into four areas: Northlands Major Events, Agriculture, Racing and Gaming, and Sales, Hospitality and Client Services. Racing and Gaming accounts for both the most revenue and the most expense – that area of the business lost over $7 million in 2009.

As David Staples noted, I don’t know how they get to 2500+ events.

Some other numbers, from the presentation this morning:

  • $5.8 million is the base cost of operating Rexall Place each year
  • $10.9 million is the cost of operating Rexall Place if you include hockey
  • $17.1 million is the cost of operating Rexall Place after including all other events
  • $1.1 million is the amount the Oilers contribute towards those operating costs
  • $2.2 million is the amount the City of Edmonton contributes toward those operating costs each year (adjusted for inflation)

The Oilers pay Northlands $1 to rent Rexall Place – that agreement is set to expire on June 30, 2014. Northlands pays the City of Edmonton $1 to rent the land its facilities are located on – that agreement is set to expire in 2034.

You can learn more about Northlands here, and you can see their answers to City Council’s questions here (PDF).

Edmonton’s FIRE Industry: $135 billion and counting

Did you know that more than $135 billion is managed right here in Edmonton? I didn’t either until I heard someone an EEDC event I was at mention it in passing. I’m sure we’ve all heard another Edmontonian gripe about our city’s lack of head offices, about how blue-collar we are, but how many people have mentioned that billion dollar stat? Not many is my guess. I decided to learn more.

The acronym FIRE stands for Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate. It’s a big industry, with more than 36,000 employees in Edmonton (roughly 5.5% of our labour force). In 2009, the FIRE industry accounted for $8.7 billion or 18% of Edmonton’s GDP. Employment in the industry has grown 23% from 2007, and GDP created from the FIRE industry has grown 40% over the last ten years (compared to 30% overall).

Those numbers come from Greg Bainbridge and Tammy Fallowfield at Edmonton Economic Development Corporation (EEDC). They were nice enough to help me gain a better understanding of the industry.

I wanted to get a sense of just how big the industry is, compared to other places. As you might expect, it’s difficult to compare Edmonton with a population of around 1 million people to Toronto, which is four or five times our size. Comparing Alberta as a whole makes more sense. That means looking at Calgary and Edmonton together, an idea that both EEDC and the Alberta Economic Development Authority (AEDA) are promoting. Greg told me that “Calgary and Edmonton are complementary financial service centres”, something that is common in other places as well (Dallas/Houston, Geneva/Zurich, Amsterdam/Rotterdam, etc). He pointed me to AEDA’s recent report entitled Building Alberta’s Financial Services Industry (PDF). Sure enough, one of the “strengths we can build upon” listed in the report is the complementary nature of Calgary and Edmonton’s financial services sectors.

The local financial services industry in Calgary has established a reputation as among the world’s best for energy financing. Edmonton’s financial services industry, meanwhile, has established strengths in banking and risk management.

The report makes the point that as a whole, Alberta’s FIRE industry is, well, on fire. From 2004 through 2009, total capital investment in Alberta totaled almost $433 billion. Here’s what the per capita investment looked like across the country in 2009 (the national average was $9,174):

Employment growth in the financial services industry in Alberta has outpaced the national average over the last ten years as well.

We’re not without challenges, of course. The AEDA report cites economic diversification as a key challenge:

Another key challenge is a shortage of skilled labour: “compared to those of other provinces with financial centres, Alberta’s labour force includes the lowest proportion of individuals with post-secondary education.”

That’s a challenge that the industry is tackling here in Edmonton. Greg described the industry as “an industry of human capital, the foundation of which is smart people”. The University of Alberta has a number of programs of course, such as the MBA program, and NAIT offers a risk management program for insurance, but beyond that there isn’t much in the way of FIRE-specific education. Many of the industry’s senior positions have been filled by drawing expertise from elsewhere, and attracting talent has been a major focus of the industry.

That’s one of the reasons that EEDC recently formed the Financial Services Working Group here in Edmonton. Greg told me that the industry has grown quite organically and independently thus far, due at least in part to the government being located here (thinking of AIMCo and ATB, for instance), but that has meant very little coordination or working together (a mission to Toronto in June 2009 focused on recruitment was one of the first tangible examples of working together). The working group, which met for the first time in October, is brainstorming ways to further the industry, and working more closely with educational partners such as NAIT to develop relevant curriculum is a key outcome of that effort.

Continuing education of the industry’s labour force is another goal. Conferences, luncheons, and other events are all being considered. Though the University of Alberta has the only Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) partnership in Western Canada, there isn’t a strong understanding of the designation in the industry (think of it as the CA equivalent for investment professionals). There are also opportunities to share research being done at the University of Alberta more directly with the industry.

So who are some of the key players in the FIRE industry in Edmonton?

  • Canadian Western Bank – Formed as the result of a series of mergers & acquisitions, but started in 1984 as the Bank of Alberta. CWB has nearly $12 billion in assets, more than 1200 employees, and has achieved 89 90 consecutive profitable quarters.
  • ATB Financial – Founded in 1938 under William Aberhart. ATB has more than $25 billion in assets and more than 5000 employees.
  • Servus Credit Union – Formed as the result of a series of mergers, the largest of which was Capital City Savings, formed in 1987. Servus has nearly $10 billion in assets and more than 2000 employees.
  • AIMCo (Alberta Investment Management Corporation) – Created by legislation in March 2007. AIMCo manages approximately $71 billion and ranks as one of the five largest institutional investment managers in Canada.
  • Peace Hills Trust – Established in 1980. Peace Hills has nearly $500 million in assets and over 120 employees.
  • Peace Hills Insurance – Established in 1982. Peace Hills has more than $270 million in assets and more than 175 employees.
  • ATRF (Alberta Teachers’ Retirement Fund) – Has been administering a pension plan for Alberta teachers since 1939. ATRF has assets of roughly $5 billion.

These organizations and others in the FIRE industry will play an important role in the future economic growth of our city and province. As the AEDA report states:

The financial services industry is a critical enabler of economic growth, competitiveness, scalability, and productivity. It provides businesses and other industries across the economy with the necessary capital, financial support and advice to pursue opportunities and compete internationally. A robust financial services industry facilitates connections and access to international markets, and helps develop local entrepreneurship, equity, and wealth.

They might be large, but these organizations are also part of the community. ATB Financial, for instance, is a very active community member with thousands of volunteers hours and millions of dollars invested.

The future for the industry looks bright, and initiatives such as the working group should help to take the industry to the next level. Greater engagement with educational partners is important, but the industry will need to make even broader connections to truly succeed. Organizations such as the Edmonton Financial Literacy Society (of which Greg is the chair) can help in that regard. It’s also encouraging to see people like Larry Pollock, CEO of Canadian Western Bank, connect with young professionals like he did at the Emerging Business Leaders’ September meeting.

Edmonton’s FIRE industry is successful and growing, with over $135 billion under management. Remember that the next time someone tells you Edmonton is blue-collar!

Two reasons journalists should learn to love Excel

I love Microsoft Excel, I really do. It’s currently the second highest item in my Start Menu, that’s how frequently I use it (now that I think about it, I should just pin it). I use it for all kinds of things – calculations, cleaning up data, and yes, generating graphs. It’s a really versatile tool, and it’s really easy to use (especially the latest version).

I often talk about changes I’d like to see in the mainstream media, and two important ones are context and presentation. There are so many stories that seem like they’re written in a vacuum. A story about housing starts is a good example, like this one from the Edmonton Journal yesterday. There’s 560 words there, words about numbers. Is that the best way to present that information? And even if you think it is, where’s the context? How do the housing starts this month relate to averages and historical numbers?

That’s the first reason that journalists should learn to love Excel – it can make providing context and better presentation easy. Here are three simple graphs, created with Excel, that tell you about housing starts in Edmonton.


This data comes from a PDF provided by the City of Edmonton. It shows annual housing starts since 1970. Copy and paste into Excel and you’re done!


This graph shows monthly housing starts from October 2008 until now. It uses data from the CMHC’s Reports & Publications section. Took maybe 10 minutes of copying and pasting.


This graph compares housing starts for this time of year from 2006 until now. Also comes from the CMHC.

Imagine if the article included graphs like these. The journalist could then focus on telling a more interesting story.

So, what’s the second reason journalists should learn to love Excel? Well, it can help them get their story right. Here’s what the Journal article starts with:

Despite a strong spring, the slowing trend in new-home construction became clear in October with housing starts dropping to their lowest level since June 2009 in the Edmonton region.

As you can see from the second graph above, that’s just not true. Is there a slowing trend? Maybe, if you just look from the spring to now. Was October the lowest level since June 2009? No. There were just 690 starts in August 2010. In fact, there were six months with lower housing starts since June 2009. I’m not sure what data the Journal was looking at, but it doesn’t appear to be CMHC data.

Add Excel to your toolkit. You won’t regret it.

UPDATE: Here’s the Journal story on August housing starts. Maybe if finding archived stories was easier, Dave Cooper, who wrote the story on October housing starts, could have consulted previous Journal articles to see that the lowest level was much more recent than June 2009.

How Friday’s AMBER Alert unfolded on Twitter

On Friday afternoon, RCMP issued an AMBER Alert for 12-year-old Jacob Telford. Thankfully, he was found “in good condition” after just a few hours. For a while that evening, it seemed like every tweet in Edmonton was related to the incident. At one point during the evening, @tkoriordan said “So I’ve been away from Twitter all day. Somebody want to fill me in on what I missed?” to which @Kiri_W replied “About a billion amber alert retweets.” Curiosity got the better of me, so I looked at the data to see how the AMBER Alert unfolded on Twitter.

Here are the first four tweets that appeared:

Just heard about amber alert, young boy from #shpk, check out alert and key an eye out

1st time I have hear the emerg broadcast have a real emerg. Its ano amber alert for a little boy missing from Sherwood Park

Amber Alert in #YEG child abducted in #sherwoodpark. #Edmonton #AMBERALERT!

AMBER ALERT: 12-year-old Jacob Telford taken from Sherwood Park last night – White 2002 Ford Taurus – BC Plate: V2P4J3

Actually, Rob McAnally had one up before the main CTV Edmonton account did, but it seems that tweet has since been deleted. CTV posted the first link to a new story at 2:29 PM (that link has since been clicked over 1000 times).

From Matthew’s first tweet at 2:11:17 PM until 7:23:43 PM when Jeremy Lye’s tweet appeared declaring that the AMBER Alert had been cancelled (the first to do so), a total of 958 tweets were posted (mentioning either the AMBER Alert or Jacob Telford). That works out to just over 3 tweets per minute (in the first hour, it was nearly 7 tweets per minute). By 5 PM the next day, the total number of related tweets had grown slightly to 1126.

Of those, 983 were retweets. Here’s what the retweets looked like:

They weren’t quite the first to tweet the start or end of the AMBER Alert (they were about six minutes behind both times), but CTV Edmonton was definitely the most visible account to do so, and that is reflected in the number of retweets they received.

In total, 710 different Twitter users tweeted (or retweeted) about the incident. Just less than half were located in the Edmonton area, while some were as far away as Brazil, Russia, and Kuwait (based on the location in their profiles). I suppose there’s always a chance that their retweets could have helped (maybe they have followers in Canada) but I still have to wonder why someone who is so far away would tweet about something like this. Is it because it’s easy to click the retweet button? Is it because we all like to feel as though we’re helping? I’m not sure.

If you add up the number of followers those 710 users have, you get a potential reach of more than 288,000 users. That’s not accounting for overlap though, so the actual number is probably quite a bit less. And not all of those users will have been online to see the tweets. Still, there’s no question that the AMBER Alert was seen far and wide on Friday.

Here’s what I found interesting about all of this:

  • 85% of all the tweets posted about the incident appeared before we knew the boy was safe
  • 60% of all the tweets posted about the incident were simply retweets of CTV Edmonton’s tweets
  • It took less than 20 minutes for the first news story link to appear
  • After 24 hours, almost no one was tweeting about it anymore

You can learn more about the AMBER Alert Program here.

State of the Edmonton Twittersphere – August 2010

Welcome to the eighth State of the Edmonton Twittersphere of 2010, my look at the intersection of Twitter and Edmonton, AB. You can see last month’s stats here.

For information on the data, definitions, and other background, click here.

For August 2010:

# of local users: 8488 (an increase of 261 from July)
# of tweets by local users: 481605
# of tweets by local users containing #yeg: 35965 (7.5%)
# of tweets by local users that were replies: 167831 (34.8%)
# of tweets by local users containing links: 144532 (30.0%)
# of tweets by local users that were retweets: 34282 (7.1%)
# of tweets by local users that were twooshes: 16012 (3.3%)

Here are the numbers above in graphic form:

Here are the top clients used by local users for posting updates – BlackBerry apps really dropped off this month for some reason:

Some other interesting stats for the month:

  • Just under 51% of all local tweets were posted between 9 AM and 5 PM.
  • Local users posted roughly 10.8 tweets per minute in August (compared to 10.0 tweets per minute in July).
  • The day with the most local tweets posted was August 26 at 18232. On average, 15536 local tweets were posted each day (compared to 14390 in July).
  • Of the 167831 replies posted by local users this month, 65767 or 39.2% were to other local users.
  • A total of 1727 users posted 50 times or more in August. In comparison, 1199 users posted just once.

 

Here are the top ten most active local users (not including bots):

  1. rootnl2k
  2. DWsBITCH
  3. Lekordable
  4. CommonSenseSoc
  5. MariahEBelle
  6. DJPh03NiX
  7. gcouros
  8. kristenloverton
  9. fraygulrock
  10. Sirthinks

Here are the top ten most active local users using #yeg (not including bots):

  1. edmontonjournal
  2. Sirthinks
  3. iNews880
  4. ctvedmonton
  5. DebraWard
  6. cbcedmonton
  7. CommonSenseSoc
  8. lindork
  9. livingsanctuary
  10. mastermaq

Here are the top ten most replied to local users:

  1. PoisonLolita
  2. CommonSenseSoc
  3. ZoomJer
  4. Sirthinks
  5. Wildsau
  6. SaySandra
  7. britl
  8. DebraWard
  9. Rainyfool
  10. lindork

Here are the top ten most retweeted local users (by other local users):

  1. edmontonjournal
  2. ctvedmonton
  3. mastermaq
  4. CityofEdmonton
  5. yegfoodbank
  6. cbcedmonton
  7. iNews880
  8. Paulatics
  9. britl
  10. EnvisionEdm

Final Thoughts

Better late than never right? It has been a long time since I’ve posted any Twitter stats! A vacation, the election, all kinds of stuff has kept me busy. I think the August stats represent the start of a big increase in election-related tweets. You can see a number of #ecca users in the lists above, and there were 580 tweets posted in August using the #yegvote hashtag.

For August, the number of retweets jumped quite a bit because of changes I made to my analysis code. Previously I only counted tweets that started with “RT @” or tweets that were new-style retweets (using the retweet button). This time, I counted retweets that contained additional text as well. It’s common for users to post a retweet like “LOL! RT @…” and now those are included. The number of retweets therefore jumped from 21528 (old way of calculating) to 34282 (new way of calculating).

Considering it was the end of summer, I’m a little surprised that the average number of tweets posted per day went up!

UPDATE: @burnstand pointed out that the day with the most tweets, August 26, was the day Lady Gaga was in town.

Edmonton Election 2010: Election Result Statistics

By now I’m sure you’ve seen the unofficial election results (official results should be released tomorrow). I thought it would be interesting to look at those numbers in more detail, and with a little bit of context.

There were 14 data updates throughout the night. The first voting stations reported in at 8:31 PM, and the final one reported at 11:35 PM. Here’s what the updates looked like:

Time is along the bottom, the vertical axis represents the number of ballots cast, and the size of the balloon represents the size of the update (the data labels are the number of votes after the update). You can see that there was one very large update, at 9:48 PM.

Here’s what Stephen Mandel’s win looked like throughout the night – the difference in votes between him and nearest competitor David Dorward:

When all was said and done, Mandel had won re-election by 49,533 votes.

A total of 196,661 ballots were cast. Here are the number of votes per ward:

You can see that Ward 8 had the most votes. Because the wards changed this year from six to twelve, it doesn’t make sense to try to compare them to 2007. We can compare the winning candidates however. To get elected in 2007, a candidate on average had 12724 votes. To get elected in 2010, a candidate on average had just 8640 votes.

Here is the difference between first and second place for each ward:

You can see that the two closest races were in Ward 2 and Ward 3. Those two wards were among the busiest in terms of the number of candidates, along with Ward 6 and Ward 11. The biggest wins were in Ward 5, Ward 9, and Ward 10, all of which had strong incumbents and few competitors.

Here are the number of votes per Catholic School Ward:

And finally, here are the number of votes per Public School Ward, compared with 2007:

There were two acclamations this year, versus just one in 2007. In every other ward, the number of votes in 2010 was higher than in 2007. This isn’t surprising, given the increased interest in schools due to the closures.

Just 1217 ballots did not indicate a choice for mayor (compared to 2491 in 2007), where as 4456 ballots did not indicate a choice for councillor. A total of 44,121 ballots did not indicate a choice for school trustee (keep in mind there were two acclamations, but still).

I’ll leave you with this:

UPDATE: Official election results are now available.

Edmonton Election 2010: Nomination Day Statistics

Yesterday was nomination day, the day that all candidates in the upcoming municipal election needed to file their paperwork and pay their fees. Dave was at City Hall and has a nice overview of how things went.

Now that we know who’s running (though some may still drop out) let’s look at some stats. In total, there are 113 candidates vying for the role of mayor, councillor, public school trustee, or catholic school trustee. Here’s a breakdown of the various candidates:

I wondered about gender, since that is often a hot issue in politics. Here’s the gender breakdown for the candidates:

The web is going to play a very important role in this election. It’s the first place people turn to when they want to know more – they search. How many of the candidates could be found online as of last night? And which details did they make available?

As you can see, candidates have some work to do.

Quite a few people, myself included, followed along yesterday on Twitter. Kudos to Dave and John for live-tweeting and posting lots of photos! Here’s what yesterday’s #yegvote activity looked like:

Candidates could file their paperwork between 9am and noon, which explains the big spike in the morning.

I hope Edmontonians take the time to learn about their candidates, and to voice their concerns and thoughts on the issues facing our city. I have updated ShareEdmonton to (hopefully) help make that easier. Here’s what’s new at the Election 2010 site:

I’d love your feedback on how I can improve the Election 2010 site at ShareEdmonton. And if you find additional candidate information that I’m missing, let me know. I’ve got a few planned improvements on the way, so stay tuned!

State of the Calgary Twittersphere – July 2010

Welcome to the seventh State of the Calgary Twittersphere of 2010, my look at the intersection of Twitter and Calgary, AB. You can see last month’s stats here.

For information on the data, definitions, and other background, click here.

For July 2010:

# of local users: 10501 (a decrease of 125 from June)
# of tweets by local users: 501941
# of tweets by local users containing #yyc: 22956 (4.6%)
# of tweets by local users that were replies: 153421 (30.6%)
# of tweets by local users containing links: 148567 (29.6%)
# of tweets by local users that were retweets: 21291 (4.2%)
# of tweets by local users that were twooshes: 16440 (3.3%)

Here are the numbers above in graphic form:

Here are the top clients used by local users for posting updates:

Some other interesting stats for the month:

  • Just over 50% of all local tweets were posted between 9 AM and 5 PM.
  • Local users posted roughly 11.3 tweets per minute in July (compared to 11.7 tweets per minute in June).
  • The day with the most local tweets posted was July 30 at 19863. On average, 16821 local tweets were posted each day (compared to 16821 in June).
  • Of the 153421 replies posted by local users this month, 47364 or 30.9% were to other local users.
  • A total of 1960 users posted 50 times or more in July. In comparison, 1587 users posted just once.

Here are the top ten most followed local users:

  1. douglasi
  2. calgrasley
  3. izzynobre
  4. NatbyNature
  5. SteveMesler
  6. WestJet
  7. MarkIsMusing
  8. ahhhgolf
  9. StaceZimmerman
  10. PLRNetMarketing

Here are the top ten most listed local users:

  1. biancaquijano
  2. douglasi
  3. NatbyNature
  4. WestJet
  5. VeerUpdate
  6. NHLFlames
  7. izzynobre
  8. CarlaYoung
  9. accruing
  10. uppercasemag

Here are the top ten most active local users (not including bots):

  1. izzynobre
  2. buckshot_yyc
  3. PLRNetMarketing
  4. VaughanBuilders
  5. Kristinnuendo
  6. Victorrious
  7. calgaryplumbers
  8. CarlaYoung
  9. that_angela
  10. Missitalyxox

Here are the top ten most active local users using #yyc (not including bots):

  1. lonnietaylor
  2. ThankASoldier
  3. Hughes4MayorYYC
  4. C_DIG
  5. Reactive_Candy
  6. harperonside
  7. nenshi
  8. petrodude73
  9. QR77football
  10. MsJodyM

Here are the top ten most replied to local users:

  1. that_angela
  2. Kristinnuendo
  3. dantric
  4. nicolesaxton
  5. danellew
  6. yogicrystal
  7. Acdngirl
  8. Darren_Krause
  9. lonnietaylor
  10. twowheelgeek

Here are the top ten most retweeted local users (by other local users):

  1. calgaryherald
  2. calgarystampede
  3. cityofcalgary
  4. CBCCalgary
  5. ChinookCentre
  6. nenshi
  7. 660News
  8. YYCLostPet
  9. AvenueMagazine
  10. that_angela

Final Thoughts

A small decrease in users in July, maybe because everyone was outside doing things! No surprise that the Calgary Stampede was among the most retweeted for the month. Chinook Centre celebrated its 50th birthday on August 1, and made a big push for followers during the month of July which likely explains why it was retweeted so much. With the Calgary election heating up, it’s interesting to see that mayoral candidate Naheed Nenshi was the 6th most retweeted user. I wonder if we’ll see more election-related stats as October 18 draws near.

State of the Calgary Twittersphere – June 2010

Welcome to the sixth State of the Calgary Twittersphere of 2010, my look at the intersection of Twitter and Calgary, AB. You can see last month’s stats here.

For information on the data, definitions, and other background, click here.

For June 2010:

# of local users: 10626 (an increase of 79 from May)
# of tweets by local users: 504633
# of tweets by local users containing #yyc: 22382 (4.4%)
# of tweets by local users that were replies: 156128 (30.9%)
# of tweets by local users containing links: 148101 (29.3%)
# of tweets by local users that were retweets: 22445 (4.4%)
# of tweets by local users that were twooshes: 17296 (3.4%)

Here are the numbers above in graphic form:

Here are the top clients used by local users for posting updates:

Some other interesting stats for the month:

  • Just under 50% of all local tweets were posted between 9 AM and 5 PM.
  • Local users posted roughly 11.7 tweets per minute in June (compared to 11.4 tweets per minute in May).
  • The day with the most local tweets posted was June 17 at 20079. On average, 16821 local tweets were posted each day (compared to 16355 in May).
  • Of the 156128 replies posted by local users this month, 49139 or 31.5% were to other local users.
  • A total of 1978 users posted 50 times or more in June. In comparison, 1600 users posted just once.

Here are the top ten most active local users (not including bots):

  1. izzynobre
  2. VaughanBuilders
  3. dantric
  4. Victorrious
  5. nscafe
  6. ThisMasterpiece
  7. that_angela
  8. a_picazo
  9. PLRNetMarketing
  10. Kristinnuendo

Here are the top ten most active local users using #yyc (not including bots):

  1. calgaryherald
  2. C_DIG
  3. CalgaryBeacon
  4. Hughes4MayorYYC
  5. petrodude73
  6. jillianwalker
  7. CalgaryBeacon2
  8. harperonside
  9. nscafe
  10. that_angela

Here are the top ten most replied to local users:

  1. Kristinnuendo
  2. dantric
  3. that_angela
  4. nscafe
  5. Diegirl
  6. yogicrystal
  7. C_DIG
  8. nicolesaxton
  9. Acdngirl
  10. danellew

Here are the top ten most retweeted local users (by other local users):

  1. calgaryherald
  2. CTVCalgary
  3. cbccalgary
  4. YYCLostPet
  5. cityofcalgary
  6. Calgarystampede
  7. AvenueMagazine
  8. mikesbloggity
  9. CTVdavidspence
  10. that_angela

Final Thoughts

First off, my apologies to those of you who have been waiting for a stats update! I’ve been a little behind this summer.

There was a slight increase in the number of users in June, and a slight decrease in the number of tweets posted. I think that decrease is due to two things: one less day than in May, and the large amount of downtime that Twitter experienced in June (it was their worst month since August 2009).